Q: I don't have dental insurance. Can I still come in for a consultation and treatment?

 

A: Absolutely! Our consultations are complimentary. Further, we want to make orthodontic treatment obtainable for all our patients. You may be surprised how affordable orthodontic treatment can be. Most patients choose to make installment payments over the duration of their treatment, which in most cases is 18 to 24 months, at 0% interest. At your consultation, we will discuss your preliminary treatment plan and, in most cases, provide a quote for treatment. If after that appointment you have financial questions, call to speak with our financial coordinator. She can help you come up with a plan that fits your needs.

 

Q: You are not a member of my insurance plan. How will this affect my treatment fees and my out-of-pocket expenses?

 

A: In our experience, for specialty dentistry such as orthodontics, there is typically no difference between in and out-of-network insurance contributions. However, there are exceptions. We would be happy to check into your insurance benefits for you.

 

Q: You told me what my life time maximum for orthodontic insurance is $1,500. Why has that amount not been credited to my account?

 

A: Insurance companies typically make installment payments over the duration of treatment. Your full life-time maximum benefit will not be reflected as a credit until close to the end of treatment. Further, your personal ledger is separate from the insurance ledger. If you would like a summary of what your insurance company has paid to-date, please contact our financial coordinator.

 

Q: I don't have dental insurance. Can you suggest a plan I can purchase, as an individual?

 

A: We suggest contacting your employer or an insurance broker. However, keep in mind you have to keep insurance plans active for the entire duration of treatment in order to receive the full life-time maximum. The most common life-time maximum benefit we see is $1,500. Will 2 years of an insurance premium cost you more than you will get back in benefits? If so, it won’t be worth getting orthodontic insurance.

Commonly asked insurance questions

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